Still Not Using A Managed DNS Provider?

Did you know that if you are not using a managed DNS provider, it can be detrimental to your website and eCommerce? Most people register their domain and then just use the DNS that is provided by the registrar.  This technique is okay if you are a running a small personal website, small blogs, etc, but if you are a business that relies heavily on the up time of your website, you should definitely reconsider.

What will you gain if you choose to use a managed DNS provider?

1. Reliability
2. Speed- With our 11 points of presence across the globe, your users will be connected to the server that is located closest to them. This makes connecting and loading webpages on your site faster.
3. DNS failover protection
4. Money- Less downtime= more money in your pocket. Even a few minutes of downtime can end up costing you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars.
5. Redundancy- If your website is only hosted on two name servers (that are typically on the same network) when one goes down, they both will, bringing down your entire website.

But, why is a managed DNS provider better than your registrar? Typically, registrars do not have time to focus their energy on DNS, so this means that the servers they have available are are not as fast and have high TTLs (time to lives), which makes changing and updating values extremely slow.

Also, in most cases, your registrar will only give you two name servers to use and the name servers are usually on the same network, which means less redundancy (if one goes out, they both will, bringing down your entire site) and are usually hosted on over subscribed, overworked networks.

If website is your livelihood and money maker, why not have it running on premium fuel instead of regular? Check out our Plus DNS. No-IP Plus offers all of the above features for a small fraction of the cost that one outage to your website could cost. What are you waiting for?

Part Two: What are NS Records and Why Are They Important to DNS

A NS record or (name server record) tells recursive nameserverswhich name servers areauthoritative fora zone.  Recursive nameservers look at the NS records to work out who to ask next when resolving a name.

You can have as many NS records as you would like in your zone file.   The benefit of having multiple NS records is redundancy of your DNS service.  It is important to note that in order to get the most redundancy out of your NS records, they should be hosted on different network segments.  If they are not hosted on different networks segments and the network goes down, your DNS goes down with it. Check out No-IP Plus if you are interested in redundancy and reliability for your domain.

NS records help to ensure that all of the domains on your server are available at all times. Multiple NS records ensure that your customers are able to reach your site each and every time without any problems, even if one or more of your name servers are unreachable. (Again only if they are hosted on different network segments.)

An example of this is if your business is located in an area that is hit by a natural disaster and your web servers at that location are down, your NS records will point to an additional name server that is hosted elsewhere (where mother nature has not wreaked havoc) and the customers are still able to reach your site and will never suspect anything is awry.

Another great example is if your website is attacked by a DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack your entire website will not be down. Traffic will be routed to the other name server location that has the backup of the primary name server.

Please see the following example of the NS records for No-IP.com
no-ip.com. 73002 IN NS ns1.no-ip.com.
no-ip.com. 73002 IN NS ns2.no-ip.com.
no-ip.com. 73002 IN NS ns3.no-ip.com.
no-ip.com. 73002 IN NS ns4.no-ip.com.
no-ip.com. 73002 IN NS ns5.no-ip.com.
no-ip.com. 73002 IN NS ns1.no-ip.com.

Questions or Comments? Please leave them below.

 

Why Reliable DNS is Important To Your Business

Imagine, it’s 8:05am on a Monday morning. You log in to your computer and open up your email client, you read through a couple of emails that you received over the weekend and then you decide to reply to one of them, you hit send and…. NOTHING. The email won’t go out! You frantically pick up your phone and dial your IT department.

Across the country, a potential client who found your web URL on your Facebook page or some other type of advertisement wants to visit your site and see what you have to offer.  They try to type your web URL into their web browser, and…. NOTHING. So, they do a quick Google search and find one of your competitors.  Your competitor’s site is working fine, so they spend their money on that site.

Do these scenarios sound like something you don’t ever want to happen? Well, you better make sure that you have reliable DNS.

DNS is essential for many reasons. When a customer wants to visit your website, they type your Fully Qualified Domain Name, www.yourbusiness.com, into their web browser.  Without DNS, your customers would have to remember the specific IP address (i.e. XX.XX.XX.XX) that your website is listed at.  This could be very difficult, especially if your website has more than one IP address that points to that specific URL.  IP addresses can vary across the globe.  The DNS does all the work by redirecting the users to the correct web address, and making sure they are reaching the site that is hosted nearest to them, thereby ensuring that your customers are connected to your site the fastest way they can be and that traffic is balanced across all of the servers.

The location of DNS servers is important in ensuring 100% uptime. We deploy name servers across the globe at geographically unique datacenters using different tier 1 bandwidth providers to ensure a natural disaster or connectivity outage does not disrupt our robust DNS network.

DNS helps direct your emails to the proper servers, redirect customers to the proper domain and ensures that they reach your site the fastest and best way that they can at all times, even if mother nature decides to rear her ugly head.

How has having reliable DNS helped you in the past?