6 Easy Steps to Remote Access a Device

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Let’s be honest, remote accessing a device can be hard. Dynamic DNS solves the issues surrounding remote access, but it is a often viewed as a complicated process that someone who isn’t very tech savvy can get confused by. Remote access is very common these days. People use it to connect to their home network while away, view an IP camera while they are on vacation to make sure their house is safe, or even monitor an elderly relative who would like to still enjoy the freedom of living alone.

The most common devices that people remote access are computers, webcams, DVRs, music libraries, thermostats, or any device that has remote access capabilities.

Follow these 6 easy steps to access your device from outside of your home network.

1. First, create your No-IP Dynamic DNS hostname. You can even register/transfer a domain and use our Plus Managed DNS to create a hostname on your very own personalized domain. (i.e. home.yourname.com and officecamyourbusiness.com)

You can do this by creating a new No-IP account. If you already have a No-IP account, login, and go to the Hosts/Redirects tab. Click Add a Host. Type in your desired hostname and choose a domain. Leave all of the settings as is and click Add Host to save. (If you ISP blocks port 80, you will need to turn on Port 80 Redirect, but we will explain more about this in Step 5.)

2. If you have a dynamic IP address, you will need to run our Dynamic Update Client (DUC) on your computer to keep your hostname updated with your current IP address.

You can also check to see if your Router or Device includes No-IP as an integrated DDNS provider. If yes, you won’t need our DUC and you can simply enter your No-IP hostname into your device and it will update your hostname with the correct IP address when it changes.

3. Configure the device you want to forward traffic to with either a static IP address, or a static DHCP lease. You can do this by going into the admin settings of your router and going to DHCP reservation. You will want to do this so that your device can always be found by the same IP address on the network.

4. Test the device from your LAN. YOu will have to use the internal IP address 192.168.1.xxx:8080 to test this in your browser.

5. Next, in order to access the device from outside your network, you will need to configure your router to let the traffic through to your device. This is called Port Forwarding. If you are unsure how to forward the ports on your router, you can check out PortForward.com. Please note that Portforward.com is a tricky site to navigate. You DO NOT need to pay for the guides.

Also, if you are unsure about which ports to open, check out this list of the most common ports and their uses.

If you are using a browser and a port other than port 80, you will need to append the port to your hostname, so yourname.noip.org:8080. This often solves many problems and is a step that most people don’t realize they have to do. You can also use our port 80 redirect host type, which will send your hostname to the port you provide us, however this is designed for web browsers only and won’t work correctly for applications or games.

**If your ISP blocks port 80, you will need to use a different port. You will then need to use the Port 80 Redirect feature (turn this on via modify hosts) this will let the traffic go through on port 8080. You will not need to append the port to the end of your hostname.**

6. Lastly, test your port connection from outside your network. You can do this by visiting portchecktool.com. Type the port in that you just forwarded. It will tell you if the port is open and accessible from outside your internal network.

Remember, opening and forwarding ports on a router effectively exposes your internal network to the Internet. You should only open the ports that are needed to get your devices to work and always make sure your computers have all the latest patches and security updates applied in order to minimize the possibility of someone compromising your network.

If you find that your device is accessible from within your network, but not from outside, it is probably a port forwarding issue. Our suggestion to you would be to redo that section. If it is still not working, open a support ticket and we will try to troubleshoot the issue.

Have you setup your own remote access to your network? What kind of device did you configure and why? How much money has our dynamic DNS saved you over the years, compared to using a cloud solution?

Have any questions or comments? Leave them below. Having trouble getting your device and network configured?  Give us a call or open a support ticket.
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What is Remote Access and How Can I Use It?

remote access

Remote access is the ability to access a computer or device remotely. It sounds simple enough, right?

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Integrated Dynamic DNS Capabilities Becoming a Thing of the Past

Did you know that during a recent poll that we conducted, 50% of our users answered the main reason that they use No-IP Free is for remote access?

integrated dynamic DNS

But even as remote access has been on the rise, many router manufacturers are actually making it more difficult for users to take advantage of easy, free, integrated Dynamic DNS solutions. We are fighting to make Remote Access even easier by offering our Integrated Services for free to manufacturers. At No-IP, we are committed to constant improvement. Our development team is continuously innovating and updating our products to help us stay at the forefront of new technologies.

Free Dynamic DNS Providers are becoming few and far between, with No-IP remaining as one of the last truly free dynamic DNS providers.

Interested in adding No-IP as an integrated dynamic DNS provider in your device? It doesn’t have to be a daunting task, download our exclusive white paper to learn how easy we make it.

[TIP] 6 Cool Ways College Students Can Use DNS

1. Research Faster and More Efficiently: Faster internet browsing for all of those last minute term papers. Sites hosted with reliable DNS will always be available when you need them most.

2. Get Better Grades: Forgot your term paper at home that’s due in 15 minutes? Don’t use the “dog ate my homework” excuse, log in to your computer from school, access your files and viola! Crisis averted.

3. Play Video Games With Your Friends From Home: Far away from all of your video game buddies from home? Wipe those tears away, because with DDNS you can run your own game server on your dynamic IP from your dorm room!

4. Be the Life of the Party: At a party with really lame music, but forgot your IPod? Be the hit of the party by accessing your entire music library on the go! (Just make sure you don’t play the YMCA.)

5. Sharing is Caring: Live in an apartment with multiple computers? Want to easily share files, music and movies? Create your own VPN server in your apartment or dorm.

6. Save Money: Food disappearing quicker than usual? Do you suspect that your roommate is secretly munching all of your Cheetos at 2am? Set up a security camera and catch the culprit red (er orange?) handed! Just make sure you keep the camera rated G by not installing them in a bathroom, bedroom, or other places where people expect privacy.

Other tips and ideas on ways college students can use DNS ? Add them below! And check out our website to learn about our awesome DNS products.