What is the Difference Between a CNAME Record, A Record, and Redirect?

An A record is the actual record. The name is resolved to the corresponding IP address.

An example of this is www.no-ip.com resolves to 204.16.252.112

CNAME records (short for short for canonical name) map your hostname to another hostname. It is useful for pointing many hosts to the same place and updating them easily.

An example of this is:

www.no-ip.com to www.noip.com

This is a CNAME record because even though the domains are different, they still go to exactly the same place and follow the same rules that are in place.

Redirects are like CNAME records in a way, but different.  Use a redirect if you want one domain to redirect to another.

An example of this is:

www.yourwebsite.com redirects to yourblog.blog.com

Have questions or comments about CNAME records, A records or redirects? Leave them below.

Want to know more about No-IP’s services? Check out our website to learn more.

No-IP Upgrades

No-IP engineers have been working hard making tons of No-IP upgrades!

Over the past few months, we have upgraded our network hardware and servers and have added more load balancers to balance traffic more efficiently.  This quarter of a million dollar expansion will bring a quicker, more reliable  service to you that is able to transmit and handle a much higher load of capacity!

To our 11 million users,  thanks again for choosing us!!! We hope you like all of the No-IP Upgrades!

Unlimited gTLDs?

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) recently approved the future use of unlimited gTLDs (Generic Top Level Domain’s).  There are a total of 22 gTLDs. These domains range from: .com to .org to .net, but starting in January 2012, that list of 22 domains, will soon expand to a limitless number! Anything you can dream up will be able to be a gTLD.

So, what do unlimited gTLDs for businesses with websites online? It means that things may get a bit interesting and expensive… The top advice that owners of businesses with an online presence hear is protect your domain(s) from possible cyber squatters.  So, if you own yourbusiness.com, you should probably own yourbusiness.net, .org, .biz, and any common misspellings of your domain name, and every possible variation (within your budget) so your customers don’t mistype your web address and end up at a website that is not owned by you.  So, with limitless TLDs when would you know to stop buying domains? Until you go broke, I guess….

Which brings me to my next point, Will everyone be able to register any top level domain?

Yes, but at a very, very HIGH price.  The application fee for the domain will be $185,000 and the yearly domain fee will be $25,000.  For major online players, that is chump change, but for small online businesses, that is an astronomical price for a domain.  So, will everyone have a custom domain? No, but just knowing that you can is pretty cool.

No-IP’s IPv6 Implementation Progress Report

A few days after World IPv6 Day (June 8th) proved that the internet is ready for IPv6 integration, we would like to give you an update as to where we are in our implementation progress here at No-IP.

Our engineers have been working hard on implementation and the process is moving right along. We have already implemented an interface for our Plus customers to add AAAA records (quad-A records) to their domain and one of our name servers is currently answering IPv6 requests.

We plan to have more implemented later in the year and we will continue to focus on making IPv6 more integrated with our services. We had planned on participating in World IPv6 Day, but unfortunately, we ran into some issues with a data center migration and peering with the proper bandwidth providers. These set backs further reiterate how many hurdles there are in order to have true IPv6 connectivity.

Thanks again for choosing No-IP!

Questions or comments about IPv6 connectivity? Leave them below!

Go Phish! Top Tips on Protecting Yourself From Phishing

Phishing scams are everywhere and are growing at an astounding pace. According to Webopedia.com the definition of phishing is “the act of sending an e-mail to a user falsely claiming to be an established legitimate enterprise in an attempt to scam the user into surrendering private information that will be used for identity theft.”

The most common form of phishing is an email that requests for you to verify, update or confirm something for an account. Oftentimes, the email is accompanied by an official logo of a company with all links contained in the email looking like they are from the official company.

The email will request for information like your login name, password or even your social security number.  Emails with such requests should never be taken seriously, companies and financial institutions would never request such information via email.

So, how do you distinguish an email from an illegitimate source from an email from a verified, official source?

1.Let’s face it, sometimes scammers aren’t the “brightest crayons in the box,” therefore spelling and grammar errors often occur in phishing emails.

2. If an email asks for usernames, passwords or other sensitive information, chances are, the email is phishing.  Companies will never ask for sensitive information like this via email.

3. Check the links in the email. Scroll your mouse pointer of the links in the emails, but be careful not to click them.  Notice in the bottom gray bar of your browser that it will have a link.  This link is where the link will actually go to.  Just because the link says www.ourcompany.com does NOT mean it will be directed there.  You can also do the same thing for images that act like links, again, just be careful not to click on the before you know if the email is phishing or not. No matter how legit links look, ALWAYS type the link directly into your web browser.

4. After typing the link into your browser, if the page that requests for you to log in or enter other sensitive information, be sure that the page is a secure page.  You can verify this by confirming that the address in the address bar has an https, not just http.

In the unfortunate case that you happen to fall victim to a phishing scam and have given away your sensitive information, notify the companies that you have the accounts with ASAP. Also, even if you do not fall victim to a phishing email, contact the company immediately and let them know that you have received a fraudulent email.  Many companies have areas on their website where you can submit the claim to, or an email address that you can forward the email to.

No-IP Managed Mail offers superb protection against spam and phishing attempts with our acclaimed spam engine and extensive RBL lists. We even have our No-IP Anti-SPAM ECR which takes your spam protection one step further by requiring unauthorized senders of email to respond to an authorization email.

Questions or comments about phishing? Leave them below!