Common Support Questions and Answers

Common Support Questions

Q: I have No-IP Mail Reflector and a sender is blocked by the RBL I have selected, What should I do?
A: Reflector is configurable and will allow a person or domain to be added to an exception list.

Q: My monitoring system rolls over, but does not affect my host.
A: The host has not been configured. Disable the check, modify the host with your offline option and reenable the monitoring check.

Q: I am using a redirect and my host resolves to a strange IP.
A: This is correct. The first resolution is to a redirect server owned by No-IP, the second request is made by this server combining your IP:port_number.

Q: I purchased No-IP registration for $24.95, but whois says it is not registered.
A: It appears you have purchased DNS without registration. Contact No-IP directly.

Q: When I ping my hostname I get a “connection timed out” error, what’s up with that?
A: A ping request is a valid test for connectivity to a network, but not DNS resolution. So as long as you see that the name resolves to a number, DNS resolution is occurring.

Q: Am I able to get a static IP address?
A: No-IP does not offer static IP addresses, we provide you with a name that will resolve to your current IP address and can be kept updated through the use of our free software.

Q: What’s wrong with the DUC? I keep getting notices that my host will expire.
A: If your IP address does not change within 30 days, then the host is considered abandoned and removed from the account. The DUC checks for a NEW IP address, if the IP hasn’t changed, then no update is submitted. When you upgrade to Plus or Enhanced Managed DNS these notifications are disabled.

Questions, Concerns or Comments? Leave them below!

Having issues with your No-IP service that our Support Center doesn’t cover? Open a Support Request.

No-IP New Hire!

No-IP is excited to welcome our new hire, online marketing manager, Natalie Goguen. Natalie comes to us from the travel/hospitality industry where she was an online marketing manager.

“I’m excited to be a part of the No-IP team. I am looking forward to expanding our marketing efforts and further building the No-IP brand,” stated Natalie.

Welcome Natalie!

The Anatomy of a DNS Zone File: SOA Record

files-anatomy

Part ONE What is a Start of Authority (SOA) Record and What Does it Do? The first resource record in any Domain Name System (DNS) zone file is the Start of Authority (SOA) resource record. The SOA resource record is an essential part of the DNS zone file, it indicates the basic properties of the domain name server and the zone that the domain is in. Each zone file can contain only one SOA record. The SOA record is broken down into the following fields. (Please refer to the example below: each section is color-coded to match it’s corresponding field definition) ;; QUESTION SECTION: ;no-ip.com. IN SOA ;; ANSWER SECTION: no-ip.com. 565 IN SOA ns2.no-ip.comhostmaster.no-ip.com2036909809 600 300 604800 600

  1. name- The root name of the zone.
  2. TTL- Time-to-Live, is the length of time for when a zone file is set to expire. This is usually expressed in a number of seconds.
  3. class- Defines the class of record. IN stands for the Internet.
  4. name-server: The Name of the primary name server for the zone
  5. email-addr: The E-mail Address of the individual who is in charge of the domain. This is the person that emails should be directed to in order to report errors or problems with the domain.
  6. sn = serial number: The Serial Number for the zone. This number helps keep track of changes that have been made to the DNS zone file. The number has to increment when changes are made. The standard convention is YYYYMMDDnn, where YYYYMMDD is the date of revision and nn is the revision number (in case there are multiple revisions for the day). So, today’s first revision would be 2011030200 and the second would be 2011030201.
  7. refresh: The time a secondary DNS server waits before checking to see if there are changes to the zone.
  8. retry: The time the secondary DNS server should wait before retrying to check if there have been changes to the zone (if the first refresh fails).
  9. expiry: The time in seconds before the secondary DNS server should stop responding to queries for the zone.
  10. min=minimum: The minimum time-to-live (TTL). This value is supplied in query responses by servers for the zone to inform others how long they should cache a resource record provided in an answer.

A properly optimized and updated SOA record can reduce bandwidth between name servers, increase the speed of website access and ensure the site is live, even when the primary DNS server is down. Please leave any questions or comments below… Check out Part 2 and Part 3 of this series:

Part Two: What are NS Records and Why Are They Important to DNS

Anatomy of a DNS Zone File Part Three: MX Records

 

WordPress.com Hit By Major DDoS Attack!

Early this morning, three of WordPress.com’s data centers were successfully taken down by a major DDoS attack. WordPress is describing it as the largest one in it’s history. The following is an excerpt from their blog

“WordPress.com is currently being targeted by a extremely large Distributed Denial of Service attack which is affecting connectivity in some cases. The size of the attack is multiple Gigabits per second and tens of millions of packets per second.
We are working to mitigate the attack, but because of the extreme size, it is proving rather difficult. At this time, everything should be back to normal as the attack has subsided, but we are actively working with our upstream providers on measures to prevent such attacks from affecting connectivity going forward. We will be making our VIP sites a priority in this endeavor, and as always, you can contact us via xxxxx@wordpress.com for the latest update. We will also update this post with more information as it becomes available.”

DDoS attacks happen. Is your business protected?  What can help your business survive a DDoS attack? Anycast. Anycast is a routing and networking method.  In this method, the same IP address is allocated to multiple name servers or hosts that all behave the same way, carry the same content and are capable of answering the same queries.  These name servers are located in various locations across the globe. Anycast automatically directs your customers to the name server that is located closest to them.

So, why is Anycast DNS so important?

Anycast makes DNS more reliable. Instead of traffic being sent to one name server, traffic is diverted to many different name servers.  If one server is congested, another server can take some of the load.

Anycast improves performance. We are a generation of instant gratification and one of my biggest pet peeves is waiting for a website to load. With Anycast, your customers can connect to a name server that is located closest to them, therefore reducing the amount of time it takes to receive the query. If the name server is located in California all queries from the west coast will be fast, but if the query is from New York, the queries will be slow, and queries from London will be even slower.  Anycast solves this problem and assures that all of your traffic is fast, no matter where the query is coming from.

Increase resilience to Internet Based Attacks. With multiple name servers available, attacks are mitigated and often concentrated to one server, rather than taking down the entire network.  Queries can be diverted to another name server in this instance, therefore causing no interruption of service.

Maintenance can be performed without any interruptions in service. During regular maintenance, DNS traffic is simply routed to the next available name server, therefore your customers are never without service.

Anycast DNS is great way to improve performance and resiliency of your network.

Since 2007, No-IP has been using IP anycast on some of our name server (NS) records. In the coming months all Managed and Backup DNS NS records will use anycast. Contact us today to learn more about what No-IP.com has to offer and how we can help implement Anycast DNS for your business!

Have Questions or Need Help? Check Out These No-IP Support Tips

At No-IP, we strive to be one of the best in our industry at providing A+ support to all of our customers. Please follow these No-IP support tips when you have any issues or concerns with our service. Also,have you seen our Guides and FAQs? They’re really cool, honest! A lot of common issues and questions can be answered from these guides.

Contact
The phone lines may be busy at times, so please leave us a message and the next representative will call you back as soon as possible. I cannot stress enough that our paid users SHOULD ALWAYS CALL technical support when possible, believe me when I say that your issue is important to us and we can respond fastest when we’re speaking with you directly.

But What If…
You don’t have a phone (really?) or you aren’t a paying customer? In this case, please submit a Support Ticket, it WILL take longer for us to respond to a ticket, but we will get an answer to you as quickly as we can. Tickets are responded to in the order in which they were received.

Please remember to include the following when submitting Support Tickets:

  • Subject Line: Provide either your email address or domain/host name.
  • Body: Be as descriptive as possible about the issue, what’s occurring, etc. Explain what you have already tried. (Because lets face it, I know there’s nothing more annoying than someone telling you to try what you have already done.) Also, please include what software is used in conjunction with your domain/hostname, if any.

What About E-mail?
Please do not submit support questions via email unless you have one of our Support Technicians direct email addresses. Any messages sent to other addresses will most likely be lost, forever.

We Want to Hear From You!
If you have any suggestions for guides, please let us know! Leave comments below or send then over to webmaster@no-ip.com